Want to maneuver invisible shrimp from one tank to a different. Suggestions?

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Crinkleput
6 Comments
  1. id recommend using food to lure them out into a concentrated area, then u can just scoop them out. you’ll prolly wanna do this a few times to catch any stragglers, u can also temporarily remove the plants so they have less spaces to hide. I used to put food inside of my net and wait for shrimps to climb into it lmao, it works but it’s messy

  2. I use a fish trap/ acclimation box to transfer mine. Just bait it, wait until it’s full of shrimp, close the door and transfer

  3. Agree with any baiting methods. Shrimp will be fish shy especially with Danios (shrimp probably only venture out of hiding at night).

    Daphnia or copepods could help crush that algae problem tho. Snails be solid too. Oto cats are also great nano fish for shrimp and are strong algae eaters. Am I convincing you to keep your 10G and just get a new tank anyway? Lol.

  4. I defeated cynobacteria successfully by manually removing it, lowering the light intensity, doubling my water changes for a month(I do 10-20% a week normally in that tank) and feeding like 25% less food.

    The algae will begin to receed when nitrates get lower.i still have some algae, but no bba, hair or other hard to eradicate one’s left. Just some brown algae on glass and leaves which is fine

    Floating plants will help too, but you may have to purge them if they get cynobacteria on them(I lost my carpet of 6 species due to this, now I’m down to 2 species I had from a different tank).

    It’s a lot, but it is possible to overcome.

  5. Step 1. Make them visible

  6. Ultralife blue green slime remover is shrimp safe if you follow the directions and extremely effective in wiping out Cyanobacteria. 3% hydrogen peroxide spot treated with a syringe will destroy algae but also shrimp so be careful not to blast any.

    Here’s the thing, until you figure out why you’re having these algae issues and adjust your setup accordingly, your new tank will end up the same way. Pretty much every type of algae spore is already in all of our tanks, lying dormant, waiting for the right tank conditions to start growing. I get it, it’s a downward spiral. Tank starts to look like shit, you lose motivation to maintain it. Break the cycle. It’s really encouraging watching the Cyanobacteria and algae bubble up and break apart as it gets destroyed on a cellular level. Stay on top of those water changes, cut back on your lighting schedule. Dose excel daily – take a 20ml syringe, fill it with 2ml of excel and the rest of the way with tank water. Hold the tip of the syringe just above the water line. Blast the entire contents of the syringe into the tank as hard as you can, aimed at an algae patch. It create a massive cloud of micro bubbles which I call the algae death mist.

    But if you’re dead set on starting over, emptying the tank is easy:

    -Remove plants one at a time, dunk them in and out of the tank a few times to shake off any shrimp potentially hanging on/stuck. Discard plants (they’re “contaminated”, that’s why you’re starting over right?).

    -remove the rocks

    -wait an hour or so for all the dirt you just kicked up to settle and your water to clear up again.

    -drain all but 1-2 inches of water from the tank. Now that have literally nowhere to hide. Scoop them out, put them in a small container some tank water, start drip acclimating to the new tank. Let their container fill up and pour most of it out a few times. Scoop out shrimp and release in the new tank – don’t dump the water. Even though at that point it’s probably less than 1% your original tank water – it’s contaminated remember?

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